Our
Emerging
Leaders
Conventions
and
Conferences
Registration
Our
Charitable
Works
Join the
Knights and
Ladies
The Claver Shield
Catholic Life
 











    Pray for the Protection of Life
   Visit BlackCatholicsForLife.org


Click Here to Purchase KPC Items

 
 
“Dialogue is critical to resolving this particular issue,” Dr. Joseph Capizzi, a moral theologian at the Catholic University of America, told EWTN News. “We have kicked the can down the road for 50-plus years, with regard to Korea.” “And the further we kick the can down the road, the more difficult the situation becomes, the less solvable it becomes by the use of force. So dialogue is more essential now than it ever was before.” Read More
Catholic YouTube junkies of the world, unite – you are needed for the New Evangelization. That was essentially the message of the recent Catholic YouTubers Hangout, the first-of-its-kind online meeting of dozens of Catholics from around the world who last month about bringing the Gospel to their YouTube channels. About 50 channels logged on to take part, hailing mostly from the United States, but also with channels joining from places like Italy, Brazil and Spain. Read More
A strong community is created when young people are involved in leadership positions. The Knights of Peter Claver, the largest African-American Catholic lay organization in the world, created the Junior Division to encourage strong leadership skills for youth. The Junior Division has the same mission and structure as the Knights, but is comprised entirely of Catholic youth ages seven through 18. The Junior Knights and Daughters have local and state divisions through which youth can gather to impact their community through events, conferences and community outreach. This division enables youth to not only be part of a large organization, but to be leaders. Members enter into an election for leadership positions across the local, state and national levels. Read More
Black Catholics must work harder to bridge the racial divide in communities, the nation and within the church, while the Catholic Church needs to be a stronger force in confronting the systemic racism at the root of mass incarceration and economic inequality. That was the key message at the 12th National Black Catholic Congress that attracted more than 2,200 participants July 6-9 Read More
Last year, Katie Hafner for the New York Times reported that in Britain and the United States, roughly one in three people older than 65 live alone. In the United States, half of those older than 85 live alone. Studies in both countries show the prevalence of loneliness among people older than 60 ranging from 10 percent to 46 percent. While not a physical sickness in and of itself, chronic loneliness can also be detrimental to physical health. Several studies show that social isolation or feelings of loneliness can lead to an increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke and even an earlier death. Read More
On Tuesday Pope Francis declared a new category of Christian life suitable for consideration of beatification called “offering of life” – in which a person has died prematurely through an offering of their life for love of God and neighbor Read More
Pope Francis addressed members of the National Football League Hall of Fame on Wednesday, encouraging them to promote the values of sportsmen not only on the field but also within their communities. “Teamwork, fair play and the pursuit of personal excellence are the values – in the religious sense, we can say virtues – that have guided your own commitment on the field,” said the Pope, meeting with the hall-of-famers on June 21. “Yet these same values are urgently needed off the field, on all levels of our life as a community.” Read More
Bishop Frank Dewane of Venice, chairman of the domestic justice and human development committee, focused on the underlying principles by which the bishops approach health care. No law should “compel us or others to pay for the destruction of human life,” he said June 15, explaining respect for life, the first of the four “key principles.” The other principles he enumerated were  true access for all, true affordability, comprehensive and high-quality coverage, and no repeal of the Affordable Care Act without an adequate replacement. He also mentioned the importance of conscience protections. He said those seeking health care should be able to do so “in accord with their means” and noted that “immigrants continue to be left out of this equation in many ways.” Speaking about true affordability, he noted the bishops’ concern regarding “structural changes in Medicaid that would leave large numbers of people at risk to losing access.” Read More